La Danza del Venado

venado-03

La Danza del Venado, or Deer Dance, is perhaps one of the most popular folkloric dances from Mexico. It is performed frequently in hotels in Puerto Vallarta, and I’ve also seen it performed at Vallarta Adventures’ Rhythms of the Night. In the dance, a deer fights for his life, as he is chased by two hunters, who ultimately succeed at killing him. I recently met Cruz Juan Martínez, a former first dancer of acclaimed Amalia Hernández Folkloric Dance Company in Mexico City. He now manages VallarDance, his own dance company, here in Puerto Vallarta. When I mentioned to him that I was looking for a handsome folkloric dancer for an editorial feature I was working on, he quickly volunteered his brother, Ramsés, who turned out to be the nicest, sweetest guy I could have worked with. I couldn’t help experiment a bit, setting up one of my camaras on a tripod to capture a time-lapse sequence, and incorporate it into a short video feature (below). Learn more about VallarDance by contacting Cruz Juan Martínez via email.

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La Danza del Venado

venado-03

La Danza del Venado, or Deer Dance, is perhaps one of the most popular folkloric dances from Mexico. It is performed frequently in hotels in Puerto Vallarta, and I’ve also seen it performed at Vallarta Adventures’ Rhythms of the Night. In the dance, a deer fights for his life, as he is chased by two hunters, who ultimately succeed at killing him. I recently met Cruz Juan Martínez, a former first dancer of acclaimed Amalia Hernández Folkloric Dance Company in Mexico City. He now manages VallarDance, his own dance company, here in Puerto Vallarta. When I mentioned to him that I was looking for a handsome folkloric dancer for an editorial feature I was working on, he quickly volunteered his brother, Ramsés, who turned out to be the nicest, sweetest guy I could have worked with. I couldn’t help experiment a bit, setting up one of my camaras on a tripod to capture a time-lapse sequence, and incorporate it into a short video feature (below). Learn more about VallarDance by contacting Cruz Juan Martínez via email.

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