Create Wall-Friendly Photo Enlargements

Here is a project that I did for my living room that allowed me to hang a large-format photograph on the wall without any nails! It will allow you to create poster-size enlargements of your favorite images and create a dramatic focal point without spending a ton of money in the process. And the best part, you won’t damage your walls, a particularly useful feature for those of us that don’t own our own dwelling. The whole project will take a couple of hours from start to finish, but you will be quite happy with the results.

What you need:

  • A suitable image, which can be a photo you took, the poster of your favorite movie, the options are endless. It has to be in jpg format and it doesn’t need to be very high resolution
  • Access to the internet in order to “process” your image
  • Access to a laser-printer
  • Letter-size transparencies (acetate sheets) compatible with your laser-printer.
  • Multi-purpose adhesive squares (sold locally as Tak, made by Pritt, available at the office supply stores
  • Sharp X-acto knife
  • Straight ruler
  • Cutting matte

Instructions

1. Rasterbate your image
Point your web browser to http://homokaasu.org/rasterbator/, the home of The Rasterbator, a free website that allows you to create multi-page enlargements of your image of choice. It is very easy to use! And since it’s free, you will want to spend as much time here, rasterbating your images and trying different settings, sizes, etc., until you get the result you are looking for. There is even a nice gallery of creations folks have submitted, so you may want to look for inspiration there as well. Once you are happy with your result, you will end up with a PDF file to print.

2. Print your image onto the transparencies
You actually could print your image onto paper if you want. I happen to have textured white walls, which added an extra level of “interestingness” to the project by appearing to “blend” onto the wall itself. If your wall is a dark color, acetate may not work. Also, some printers are rather finicky about acetate, so experiment first!

3. Trim your transparencies
Since most printers do not print all the way to the edge of the paper, you will have to trim your output. The good thing is that the PDF produced by the Rasterbator includes useful optional guides that you can print and thus know exactly where to cut. A sharp X-acto knife produces the best results, but watch your fingers!

4. Use the sticky squares thing to attach the transparencies to the wall
One by one-attach your transparencies to the wall using the sticky squares. Acetate is light enough that I take each square and divide it in four pieces, attaching one to each corner of the transparencies.

5. Enjoy your results!

2 thoughts on “Create Wall-Friendly Photo Enlargements

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Create Wall-Friendly Photo Enlargements

Here is a project that I did for my living room that allowed me to hang a large-format photograph on the wall without any nails! It will allow you to create poster-size enlargements of your favorite images and create a dramatic focal point without spending a ton of money in the process. And the best part, you won’t damage your walls, a particularly useful feature for those of us that don’t own our own dwelling. The whole project will take a couple of hours from start to finish, but you will be quite happy with the results.

What you need:

  • A suitable image, which can be a photo you took, the poster of your favorite movie, the options are endless. It has to be in jpg format and it doesn’t need to be very high resolution
  • Access to the internet in order to “process” your image
  • Access to a laser-printer
  • Letter-size transparencies (acetate sheets) compatible with your laser-printer.
  • Multi-purpose adhesive squares (sold locally as Tak, made by Pritt, available at the office supply stores
  • Sharp X-acto knife
  • Straight ruler
  • Cutting matte

Instructions

1. Rasterbate your image
Point your web browser to http://homokaasu.org/rasterbator/, the home of The Rasterbator, a free website that allows you to create multi-page enlargements of your image of choice. It is very easy to use! And since it’s free, you will want to spend as much time here, rasterbating your images and trying different settings, sizes, etc., until you get the result you are looking for. There is even a nice gallery of creations folks have submitted, so you may want to look for inspiration there as well. Once you are happy with your result, you will end up with a PDF file to print.

2. Print your image onto the transparencies
You actually could print your image onto paper if you want. I happen to have textured white walls, which added an extra level of “interestingness” to the project by appearing to “blend” onto the wall itself. If your wall is a dark color, acetate may not work. Also, some printers are rather finicky about acetate, so experiment first!

3. Trim your transparencies
Since most printers do not print all the way to the edge of the paper, you will have to trim your output. The good thing is that the PDF produced by the Rasterbator includes useful optional guides that you can print and thus know exactly where to cut. A sharp X-acto knife produces the best results, but watch your fingers!

4. Use the sticky squares thing to attach the transparencies to the wall
One by one-attach your transparencies to the wall using the sticky squares. Acetate is light enough that I take each square and divide it in four pieces, attaching one to each corner of the transparencies.

5. Enjoy your results!

2 thoughts on “Create Wall-Friendly Photo Enlargements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

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